Looking at this I can hear the bike tyres on that tarmac #cycling

Looking at this I can hear the bike tyres on that tarmac #cycling

vintageblackglamour:

"Education begins at the home. You can’t blame the school for not putting into your child what you don’t put into him." - Geoffrey Holder. The legendary dancer Carmen de Lavallade shared this beautiful photo on her Facebook page of her husband, the legendary dancer, actor, painter and director Geoffrey Holder with their son, Leo. While I understand that Mr. Holder is retired, Ms. Carmen de Lavallade is still performing masterfully today! Her latest show, “As I Remember It” will have its world premiere at Jacob’s Pillow in Massachusetts in June 2014 and will tour nationally through 2015. You can visit her website for more information. http://www.carmendelavallade.com/current/ 

Truth

vintageblackglamour:

"Education begins at the home. You can’t blame the school for not putting into your child what you don’t put into him." - Geoffrey Holder. The legendary dancer Carmen de Lavallade shared this beautiful photo on her Facebook page of her husband, the legendary dancer, actor, painter and director Geoffrey Holder with their son, Leo. While I understand that Mr. Holder is retired, Ms. Carmen de Lavallade is still performing masterfully today! Her latest show, “As I Remember It” will have its world premiere at Jacob’s Pillow in Massachusetts in June 2014 and will tour nationally through 2015. You can visit her website for more information. http://www.carmendelavallade.com/current/ 

Truth

hyperallergic:

Creative Dissidents Commemorate 25th Anniversary of Tiananmen Square Massacre

Today marks the 25th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square Massacre, and many — including one of China’s most famous dissidents, the artist Ai Weiwei — are commemorating the occasion with personal protests.

READ MORE

fastcompany:

This Lamp Uses Physics To Perfectly Reproduce The Sky’s Beautiful, Evolving Colors

Japanese designer Yoshiki Matsuyama is fascinated by science—particularly the biological and physical explanations for the shapes, colors, and textures of nature. So when he entered a recent design challenge on the theme of curiosity, he decided to create a product that answers a classic question: Why is the sky blue?

Read More>

cultofkimber:

Damn, I was for gay marriage specifically because I thought we’d get a plague out of it. Now I have to rethink my whole stance.

Love is all you need

cultofkimber:

Damn, I was for gay marriage specifically because I thought we’d get a plague out of it. Now I have to rethink my whole stance.

Love is all you need

explore-blog:

Susan Sontag on beauty vs. interestingness – fantastic read

explore-blog:

Susan Sontag on beauty vs. interestingness – fantastic read

karenhurley:

Make things not excuses by Sean McCabe

There is no try

karenhurley:

Make things not excuses by Sean McCabe

There is no try

Facebook: We’ve only gone and built a panopticon - each and every one of us

"He who is subjected to a field of visibility, and who knows it, assumes responsibility for the constraints of power; he makes them play spontaneously upon himself; he inscribes in himself the power relation in which he simultaneously plays both roles; he becomes the principle of his own subjection" - Michel Foucault

The panopticon - a theoretical prison building where a single guard in a central tower can observe all inmates at all times - was supposed to be the ideal architectural expression of modern disciplinary power. Ruthlessly efficient, it used people’s own paranoia as a means of exercising control over them.

The concept was deemed so reductive, mechanistic and inhumane that no true panopticon was ever built (the now abandoned Presidio Modelo in Cuba - pictured above - is the nearest facsimilie). 

But perversely, we’ve all essentially gone and built one for ourselves.

Facebook’s ubiquity has reached the point where most users have built up networks so large, sprawling and broad that they represent only a faceless other - ‘them’.

Parents, siblings, actual friends, passing acquaintances, your boss, colleagues, former classmates you haven’t seen in 20 years, ex-girlfriends, their husbands - they all merge, blur and homogenise to become a big, unwieldy, meaningless ‘them’.

Dunbar’s theory dictates that you can only really ‘know’ 150 people. As a complex, sensitive human being, chances are you’re dynamic enough to know how to communicate with roughly that many individuals.

But the conglomeration of such disparate individuals into one network does funny things to people. We perform, we accentuate, we airbrush, we self-censor. It’s got to the point where many people find it hard to say anything vaguely meaningful, controversial, emotional or valuable on Facebook.

We all know this, deep down. Just consider how you use Facebook these days. We know that what we say could reach pretty much anyone. It’s the best thing about Facebook, but also it’s biggest challenge and the reason Snapchat et al are doing so well.

We’re incapable of conceptualising those few hundred or thousand people we’re connected to on Facebook as individuals, so instead we create a panopticon tower in our own minds.

This Facebook panopticon - everyone you’ve ever known merged into a single all-knowing entity which may or may not be watching - has a similar effect on pretty much everyone. Just as every personalised car numberplate essentially says ‘dickhead’, every Facebook post in the modern era essentially says ‘check me out, look how good I am’.

But we’re not prisoners in this new panopticon of our minds. We have a choice. And we’re making it, in small subconscious ways, every day. By holding back the things that have value, meaning, anything more than a superficial ‘see what a fun, grounded and fun person I am’, we’re trying to salvage some privacy from the all-seeing eye.

Networks are best when they’re relevant and specific. On one network you can be one thing, on the other you can be something altogether different. You pick and choose who to connect with. You can express the things you deem to be relevant and meaningful for different audiences.

Yes people enjoy the variety of being connected to real, varied human beings on social media - no one likes the boring bloke in the pub who always talks about the same thing - but when a network gets as big as Facebook the scale and breadth of the network itself becomes oppressive, stifling and an anathema to the openness that makes social media special.

We’re all multifaceted creatures - no one is only their job, no one is only their drinking buddies, no one is only a father or a daughter or a wife.

It’s why Google +, and other well-thought-through social tools, have adopted an altogether more sophisticated model, one where you can quickly and easily choose the segments or communities within your network you want to reach. You can be someone different, you can tailor your message.

Whether that level of sophistication will ever achieve the scale it needs to make it really valuable remains to be seen - God knows, Facebook have tried hard to introduce it.

But as it stands we’re all toning down, polishing up and airbrushing our lives on Facebook to the point where the world’s biggest social network is becoming irrelevant, meaningless and worth very little. In the clamour for more and more users, are social network owners giving themselves a ubiquity problem that could ultimately be their undoing?

Don’t give up on books. They feel so good — their friendly heft. The sweet reluctance of their pages when you turn them with your sensitive fingertips. A large part of our brains is devoted to deciding whether what our hands are touching is good or bad for us. Any brain worth a nickel knows books are good for us.

If This Isn’t Nice, What Is? (via wearethedigitalkids)

I’ve been reading on the iPad a lot recently. But last weekend I borrowed a book. A real one. With pages and ink and weight and no back light. Felt good.

Try not to compromise. So many people don’t do what they really want in their hearts because they feel like they’re not good enough, or they’re not smart enough, or they’re not talented enough… anything. And that doesn’t matter. In order for you to live a remarkable life — in order for you to live a life that is fulfilling — you need to be able to go after what you want. And if you don’t, you’re not going to achieve it — ever.
On Humble Pied, Debbie Millman shares three pieces of wisdom to guide the way to a remarkable life. Dive deeper with her timelessly wonderful illustrated-essay-turned-commencement-address on courage and the creative life. (via explore-blog)

It’s easy not to be brave, but when did your comfort zone ever give you anything worth having?